The Educator Weekend wrap: Students’ social media risks, the 'digital divide' and principals urge do

by The Educator10 Oct 2015

Making news this week, a lawyer outlines social media risks for students, we explore solutions to schools’ ‘digital divide’ and principals demand more information about domestic violence.
 
Early in the week, Queensland’s school leaders said they were not always informed of domestic violence orders made against parents of school children, and that this needed to change. Queensland Association of State School Principals (QASSP) president, Michael Fay, told the ABC that being better informed would allow principals to better understand the issue, adding that it can “seriously affect the operation of a school”.
 
Responding to September’s OECD report showing computer-based technology was failing to boost learning outcomes, Simon Webber from Brighter Image told The Educator that while intentions were good, computers alone won’t improve learning outcomes and that schools needed “good teacher methodology working through that medium”.
 
In the wake of a student being arrested for allegedly posting online threats against NSW Police, Alex Kohn from Makinson d’Apice lawyers told The Educator why schools need to provide students with thorough social media training to help them understand the consequences of their online actions. “It should be a compulsory part of the curriculum. I don't think they fully appreciate the legal risks they face by making malicious or even careless comments online,” Kohn said.
 
And according to new research out of Monash University, there is a direct link between parents’ aspirations for their children and their academic success. The data showed that 95% of private school parents discussed higher education with their child, compared with 91% in Catholic schools and 89% in state schools. "Parents of children attending private schools generally have higher aspirations for their children. It can be concluded that these aspirations reflect an expectation by private school parents for a 'return on investment'," the report stated.
 
 

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