New strategy aims to get students ‘work ready’

by Robert Ballantyne23 Feb 2017


As schools, communities and governments discuss how to best prepare today’s students for tomorrow’s workforce, it is broadly agreed that the most important skills students will need are creativity, problem-solving and digital competency.

However, with these 21st century skills in high demand by modern organisations that rely on them to function, ensuring that students are properly skilled, and have a clear path to these jobs once they finish school, is crucial.

Recognising this, the Federal Government created the National Career Education Strategy Working Group, which it is now meeting with for the first time to map out a national strategy to transform the delivery of career education to students.

In a statement on Monday, Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, Karen Andrews, said the group was a key part of the Government’s $3m election commitment to ensure students are “work ready” when they finish school.

“The strategy will be aimed at helping students develop a clear path to the workforce and be prepared for life beyond school, including the jobs of today and the future,” Andrews said.

“It’s important that Australian students are adequately prepared with the right skills to meet the needs of employers in the 21st century.”

Andrews said the working group agreed to commission a research project to build a comprehensive understanding of the career education landscape.

“This research will identify best practice in career education and assist the working group to identify system-wide opportunities that can be rolled out nationally to benefit all students,” Andrews said.

“The working group will provide recommendations to the Government by July 2017 on how to support and facilitate the delivery of high-quality career education.”

Andrews added that the development of the strategy will be collaborative with membership of the working group including representatives from states and territories, the Catholic and Independent education sectors, schools, industry, parents and career practitioners.