Far Out Friday: The most oddly-named schools

by Robert Ballantyne25 Nov 2016

 
Inuman Elementary School

Yes. Inuman Elementary School. Located in Antipolo City of Rizal in the Phillipines, this K-6 school has 1,576 students (1,326 more than the average school in the country) – so it’s not surprising that each class holds a whopping 75 students. To put that in context, the average Australian classroom averages around 24 students.

 
Pansy Kidd Middle School

Located in Poteau Township, Oklahoma, Pansy Kidd has 524 students in Years 6-8. This school gets its name from a teacher, Pansy Ingle Kidd, who came to the school in the early nineteen hundreds. Having taught with passion for 42 years in numerous roles including teacher of Science, Math, and English, librarian, counsellor, and principal, Kidd was eventually named “Dean of Porteau’s Teachers”.

 
Porny School

Porny CE First School in Eton, U.K, got its name from Richard Porny, a former Master at Eton College. In January 2014 the school received a visit from Ofsted inspectors who rated the school as “inadequate”. Reasons given for the inadequate rating included 'weak teaching', poor student attendance and an inadequate curriculum. There’s no word on what the punishment is for kids who are inspired by the school name and bring illicit reading material to class…

 
EPIC School

Located in Birmingham, Alabama, EPIC School (also known as Epic Alternative Elementary School) prides itself on nurturing the individual. In case you’re wondering, the EPIC stands for Educational Program for the Individual Child. The school’s curriculum focuses on creating individualised learning plans for students, including those with disabilities.

 
Massacre Pre School

Although very little (if any) information exists on this elusive school, Massacre Pre-School is widely touted online as one of the world’s most oddly-named schools. Apart from a wall depicting cartoons below the macabre name, the school’s vision, mission and curriculum will have to be left up to the reader’s imagination. 

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